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Need some help to shut someone's mouth..
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Talking Need some help to shut someone's mouth.. - 05-21-2005, 06:26 PM

Ok, so i was talking with this guys on another forum.
Obviously, steroid came up in the discussion...

The things he was saying was completely stupid, and, i knew right away he didn't know what he was talking about. .

ill show you some example of what he told me.

[...] and when you entraines you see those guys which touches with the products and the majority of these guy there are "failures" [...]

[...]Studies show that it takes on average eight month to give the machine on the way after a cure of steroids[...]

[...]The anabolic cures makes impotent, cardiac, sometimes weak but sel*** more beautiful.[...]

[...]I know people who dope themselves need to reassure themselves by saying it is not dangerous etc... like the alcoholics, the smokers, the toxicos.[...]

Ok, so anyway, the guys continue to add more and more... so i was trying my best tell him where he was wrong from what i have learn so far...
But the guys insist, and everybody thinks he's right because he is well respected there...

SO his last comment was :

ok, since you make Mister who knows everythings, I'd like to hear you speak to us about the testo (ESPECIALLY THE BIOCHEMISTRY "PART"). , then will see who we are dealing with.

So anybody could help me answer that

if you're not too busy.


An Old school attitude in a Scientific age of society. UP THE DOSE ! *chemicallyengineered*
   
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05-21-2005, 06:28 PM

hey i tried my best to translate from french to english... I hope you will understand.


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huh
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Question huh - 05-21-2005, 06:39 PM

And the guys here say,what the _____is kell talking about?
Just Trying to read that post made my motor hurt.
I read and re-read before realizing,this moron mustv' been speaking another language(at best).
How do you help shut him up?you cant
Remove yourself from the equation...Dont rap w/ the dope.


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05-21-2005, 06:43 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by imthenextone
hey i tried my best to translate from french to english... I hope you will understand.
Oh,Hell.remind Pierre we cant rescue the dumb frenchman again.
they didnt appreciate it the first time.


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05-21-2005, 07:02 PM

yeah, that was pretty hard to decipher. i would just say research it yourself. and i dont bother with the french unless there hot females with no hair on their pits.


Disclaimer: TexasCreed does not endorse the use of Anabolic Steroids without a doctor's prescription. This is purely for entertainment and pretend purposes.
   
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05-21-2005, 07:22 PM

loll sorry, i simply used the "babel fish" thing for the translation...
i guess it's not really good ...


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05-21-2005, 07:57 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by imthenextone
loll sorry, i simply used the "babel fish" thing for the translation...
i guess it's not really good ...
This guy definitely needs some English classes. Regardless, it is very easy to find hundreds, or even thousands, of scientific, well-thought-out, explanations of the benefits of testosterone. It is the "male hormone" for god's sake! The more of it you have in your body, the "more" man you will be!!!

Who can disagree with that?!?!


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05-21-2005, 08:21 PM

Here is some positive steroid articles you can post for that asshole.

HRT article.
LE Magazine November 2000

HealthWatch

Testosterone Update
Low testosterone levels can mean high health risks

After decades of research and hype surrounding female menopause and hormone replacement therapy, men have recently started receiving some attention about their own age-related hormonal decline, known as andropause. Unfortunately, while estrogen replacement for women has been accused of threatening with breast cancer, androgen replacement therapy has been equally incriminated for raising the risk of prostate cancer. A number of studies have tried to relate high testosterone levels with the incidence of prostate cancer, but the preponderance of the evidence shows that maintaining youthful testosterone levels does not affect prostate cancer risk, whereas waning testosterone levels carry their own health threats. Declining testosterone levels can lead to the development of numerous symptoms such as a decrease in virility, libido and sexual activity, general sense of well-being, as well as fatigue, depression and sleep disturbances. In addition to problems such as sexual dysfunction or general malaise, however, low testosterone also translates into decreased muscle mass and strength, as well as a decrease in bone mass and an increase in ab***inal fat. Studies show that the latter two lay a role in degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Moreover, depleted testosterone levels are being linked to the incidence of various lipid disorders and heart disease.

Less bone, more fat

While osteoporosis hasn’t always been considered a disease that afflicts males, the rising incidence of bone mass degeneration among aging men points a finger to some age-related cause. As androgen receptors are expressed in osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) researchers now believe that androgens have some direct effect on bone formation and resorption.(1) A Belgian study using an aged rat model examined the effects of partial androgen deficiency and low-dose androgen replacement on bone and lean body mass.(2) Testosterone was administered by implants that released 11.5, 23 and 55 microg/day respectively to 12-month old male orchidectomized rats over the course of 15 weeks. Some rats received an empty implant, thus containing no testosterone. As the researchers expected, the rats that received an empty implant had significantly lower bone mineral content (-7.9%), apparent density (-5.7%), and lean body mass (-10.8%), while cancellous (-50.3%) and cortical (-1.8%) volumetric density also were decreased in the tibia. In addition, measurements of serum osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion revealed an increase in bone turnover in rats with an empty implant. Meanwhile, rats receiving the smallest dose (11.5 microg/day) were not adversely affected in any of these areas relating to bone mass. This study’s results demonstrate that even low-dose androgen therapy can have protective effects for bone mineral content, density and turnover, while also preserving lean body mass.

A growing body of research now suggests that an age-related increase in fat mass, or obesity, can be attributed to a fall in free testosterone and growth hormone levels. Moreover, studies report a connection between ab***inal obesity and increased cardiovascular mortality and Type II diabetes mellitus. Recent findings from the University Hospital in Ghent, Belgium illustrate that age is related to a drop in free testosterone levels and free insulin-like growth factor-1, while contributing to an increase in body mass index and fat mass.(3) In fact, write the investigators, such effects make it "tempting to attribute a causal role to the decrease in androgen levels." Their analysis, which consisted of 372 males aged >20-85, revealed that body mass index and age were independent factors in determining testosterone levels. These decreased by about one quarter when researchers compared the young controls to men in the elderly group, while free testosterone levels fell by almost half with age. Likewise, fat-free mass decreased by 18.9%. In a subgroup of 57 men aged 70-80 years, the lower that testosterone levels dropped, the higher the percentage of body and ab***inal fat, as well as plasma insulin levels.

Other findings indicate that low testosterone levels predisposed men to adipose fat which, in turn, seemed to raise their risk of diabetes mellitus.(4) Researchers at the University of Washington’s Department of Medicine set out to examine the effects of age-related decreasing serum testosterone levels on intra-ab***inal fat in a group of 110 second-generation healthy Japanese-American men. Measurements were taken first to establish baseline levels of glucose, body mass index, visceral adiposity, subcutaneous fat, fasting insulin and C-peptide levels, and overall testosterone levels (which were within the normal range relative to the men’s age). When the researchers performed follow-up measurements 7.5 years later, their results indicated that intra-ab***inal fat had increased by an average of 8.0 centimeters squared. More importantly, though, they found that the change in intra-ab***inal fat correlated to baseline total testosterone levels, but they were not significantly related to other measurements such as body mass index, total fat or subcutaneous fat. The study authors concluded that, in their sample, "lower baseline total testosterone independently predicts an increase in intra-ab***inal fat. This would suggest that by predisposing to an increase in visceral adiposity, low levels of testosterone may increase the risk of type II diabetes mellitus."

Similarly, another study that analyzed some of the health effects of excess ab***inal fat, also referred to as android obesity, reported that individuals exhibiting upper body excess fat distribution tend to have lower levels of plasma testosterone and growth hormone levels, suggesting what the authors describe as "complex hormonal abnormalities".(5) Ab***inal obesity lends itself to an apple-shaped figure and has been related to a heightened risk of conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease. These researchers believe that, "Visceral fat tissue, through its portal drainage, could be an important source for free fatty acids that may exert complex metabolic effects: involvement in hepatic lipogenesis, increase in hepatic neoglucogenic flux, reduction in insulin metabolic clearance and involvement in peripheral insulin resistance through a competition mechanism described by Randle." They conclude that ab***inal obesity may be related to diabetes by means of an enhanced fatty acid made available from fat tissues (visceral and subcutaneous) in individuals who are genetically predisposed to type II diabetes. Research has also pointed to the possibility of a link between ab***inal obesity and hypercorticism, or elevated cortisol levels. A reason for this, suggest scientists, might be that excess cortisol opposes testosterone and growth hormone production, both of which are regulators of body fat. Moreover, low testosterone levels also seem to encourage cortisol levels to rise and elicit their many aging effects, including immune dysfunction, brain cell injury, arterial wall damage and other assaults.

Hypogonadism and heart trouble

Low testosterone levels have also been implicated in playing a role in the development of chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cardiovascular heart disease. A study from Mahidol University in Bangkok found that, in assessing a group of Thai men and postmenopausal women over 50 years of age for levels of various hormones as they might relate to health conditions, plasma estradiol levels were highest in hypertensive men and testosterone levels were lowest in men with coronary heart disease.(6) The researchers conclude that perhaps, "Decreased testosterone and/or increased estradiol may have an adverse effect on lipid profile in elderly men." Another study conducted among a Chinese male population likewise reported that low testosterone may be a risk factor for coronary heart disease, which may relate to lipoprotein metabolism by endogenous testosterone.(7) Results showed that mean plasma testosterone levels among patients with coronary heart disease were significantly-about 40%-lower than in healthy subjects. Moreover, there was a negative association between plasma testosterone levels and plasma triglyceride levels and lipoprotein (a), which translated into higher blood lipid levels relative to lower testosterone levels. Contrarily, a positive association between plasma testosterone levels and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein 3 cholesterol meant that higher testosterone levels equaled higher "good" cholesterol levels.

The natural aging factor

It is well documented in research that sex hormones such as testosterone are vital components in the sexual development of pubescent males, as well as contributing to the increase of their muscle and bone mass as they transform from boys into men. Meanwhile, dwindling testosterone levels as a result of metabolic aging trigger the opposite kind of effects, including the loss of body hair and progression of male pattern baldness, loss of muscle and bone mass, and increased fat. Low testosterone levels aren’t just the prospect of a small segment of the male population but rather, they tend to affect the male population as a whole. Natural aging causes a gradual decline in male hormones, so that by age 70, more than a quarter of men have hypogonadal levels.(8) Some figures reveal that free testosterone levels start to fall at the rate of 1% per year after age 40.(9) While men with normal testosterone levels sometimes exhibit some of the symptoms, which may very well stem from other causes besides hypogonadism, the fact that androgen therapy usually alleviates these symptoms suggests a hormonal deficiency as the root cause of such deterioration in health.

Researchers suggest that, while it’s difficult to pin down the precise role of androgen deficiency in the aging body, many study results do suggest a positive role in maintaining adequate testosterone levels in aging males. In terms of overall body composition, for example, research has demonstrated a measurable increase in lean body mass and in mid-arm circumference and the decrease in waist-to-hip ratio in elderly men, after they received androgen replacement therapy to treat their low testosterone levels. Meanwhile, in younger, healthy men (i.e. athletes), testosterone treatment has shown to have a positive effect on increased fat-free mass of about 10% and in muscle size. More specifically, studies have shown that administering testosterone to older men with low levels can help to ward off atherogenic type diseases. For example, a Polish study of 22 men with baseline serum testosterone concentrations below 3.5 ng/ml reported that intramuscular injections of testosterone enanthate (200 mg) every two weeks for 12 months resulted in decreased total cholesterol and low-density protein cholesterol levels.(10) In addition, no significant decrease in HDL-cholesterol levels or HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol subfractions was apparent.

Such findings seem to indicate a positive therapeutic role for testosterone replacement, particularly in elderly men with hypogonadism at risk of osteoporosis or coronary heart disease. And while some researchers may still contest that raising testosterone levels can present other health threats, some new research is recognizing that testosterone isn’t all bad and has some desirable health benefits. For example, a University of Toronto study explored new approaches to treating prostate cancer through androgen ablation therapy while reducing the side effects associated with loss of testosterone.(11) The Canadian researchers examined two new innovative methods, namely ‘sequential androgen blockade’ and ‘intermittent androgen suppression.’ The first approach uses a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor to reduce the conversion of testosterone to dihydro- testosterone, plus an anti-androgen to prevent residual androgen from reaching the androgen receptor. The latter uses androgen ablation therapy intermittently so as to allow testosterone levels to replenish themselves between cycled treatment periods. Both new methods, which are under current investigation, propose to maintain certain levels of testosterone during ablation therapy, so that men undergoing treatment for prostate cancer won’t suffer the side effects of diminished levels, including loss of libido, reduced muscle mass, malaise and psychological upset.* Meanwhile, a University of Connecticut study sought to find out whether short-term administration testosterone would have ill effects on health.(12) After a 9-week period of intramuscular and transdermal testosterone to men over age 70 with low levels, researchers found that the hormonal therapy had effected no changes in bone resorption or formation, prostate symptoms, cholesterol levels or hemoglobin and hematocrit.

The adverse effects of low testosterone levels are apparent, bothersome, and serious enough to warrant further examination of how androgen impacts on various aspects of male health, and how androgen replacement therapy can serve as a means to contain age-related hormonal pitfalls. The biggest challenge may conceivably be to restore the reputation of testosterone, which has been cast as a "bad steroid" for some time. Another task for research will be to continue building a case for the vital role that androgens have with regard to bone, heart, sexual, mental health and general well being. Offering solid proof of testosterone’s various functions will help to show that, while testosterone therapy may not be appropriate for every man, it would be a shame for other men to miss out on its merits.
   
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05-21-2005, 08:21 PM

Low free testosterone levels linked to Alzheimer's disease in older men
Older men with lower levels of free, or unbound, testosterone circulating in their bloodstreams could be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) than their peers, according to new research. This prospective observational study is believed to be the first to associate low circulating blood levels of free testosterone with AD years before diagnosis.
The study appears in the January 27, 2004 issue of the journal Neurology. This work was conducted by investigators at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), one of the National Institutes of Health, and scientists at other institutions supported by NIA grants.* "Our finding that low free testosterone might be associated with an increased risk of developing of AD is a step forward in helping to understand the possible effects of sex hormones on the aging brain and other parts of the body," said Susan Resnick, Ph.D., an investigator in the NIA's Laboratory of Personality and Cognition and corresponding author of the study.
Dr. Resnick, however, cautions that much more research is needed before scientists can establish a causal relationship between low testosterone and AD. "Even if a relationship between AD and levels of free testosterone in the bloodstream is confirmed, we are very far away from knowing if hormonal therapy or any other intervention could safely prevent AD," she said.
Dr. Resnick, Scott Moffat, Ph.D., and their colleagues evaluated the testosterone levels of 574 men, ages 32 to 87, who participated in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA)**. The investigators examined free and total testosterone levels-measured over an average of 19 years-in relationship to subsequent diagnosis of AD. Based on physical, neurological and neuropsychological exams, 54 of the 574 men were diagnosed with AD.
The research team found that for every 50 percent increase in the free testosterone index in the bloodstream, there was about a 26 percent decrease in the risk of developing AD. Although overall free testosterone levels fell over time, these levels dropped more precipitously in those men who later developed AD. In fact, at the end of the study, men who were diagnosed with AD, on average, had about half the levels of circulating free testosterone as men who didn't develop the disease. In some cases, the drop-offs in free testosterone levels associated with AD were detected up to a decade before diagnosis.
Previously, Dr. Resnick and her colleagues found that older men with high levels of circulating free testosterone have better visual and verbal memory and perform spatial tasks more adeptly than their peers.
"It is quite possible that circulating free testosterone has a broad range of influences on the aging brain," Dr. Resnick said. "The effects of some of these influences-such as the role of testosterone in the development of certain types of memory loss and AD-are just beginning to be explored."
In men, testosterone is produced in the testes, the reproductive glands that also produce sperm. As men age, their testes often produce somewhat less testosterone than they did during adolescence and early adulthood, when production of this hormone peaks. Within the body, testosterone tends to bind with sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). But some testosterone remains freely circulating in the bloodstream. Unlike the SHBG-bound form of the hormone, free testosterone can circulate into the brain and affect nerve cells. In this study, only reduced levels of free testosterone were associated with AD, Dr. Resnick said.
Other BLSA studies suggest that many men older than 70 have low levels of free testosterone compared to younger men. But while prescription testosterone replacement therapy is available, it may not be advisable for most older men because many effects of hormone therapy remain unclear. It is not yet known, for instance, if testosterone replacement increases the risk of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death among men. In addition, studies suggest that in some men testosterone therapy might trigger excessive red blood cell production. This side effect can thicken blood and increase a man's risk of stroke.
"We still have much to learn," Dr. Resnick said. "For now, testosterone therapy should not be considered an option for older men seeking to reduce their risk of Alzheimer's disease or to improve their memory and cognitive performance in general."
A multi-disciplinary panel, led by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Cancer Institute, recently evaluated the pros and cons of conducting clinical trials of testosterone replacement therapy in older men to answer many of the lingering questions about the effects of this hormone in the aging body. The NIA is considering the IOM recommendations very carefully and likely will act on the recommendations to begin small-scale clinical trials to determine the efficacy of testosterone in treating symptomatic older men with low testosterone levels. Until carefully designed and monitored clinical trials are conducted, the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy for most men who do not have extreme deficiencies of the hormone will remain largely unknown.
###
AD is an irreversible disorder of the brain, robbing those who have it of memory, and eventually, overall mental and physical function, leading to death. For more information on AD research, two new publications are available from the NIA: 2001-2002 Alzheimer's Disease Progress Report and Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery, which includes a CD-Rom animation of what happens to the brain in AD. These publications may be viewed at NIA's AD-dedicated website www.alzheimers.org, the Institute's Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, or by calling ADEAR at 1-800-438-4380.
The NIA, one of 27 Institutes and Centers that constitute the National Institutes of Health, leads Federal efforts to support and conduct basic, clinical, epidemiological, and social research on aging and the special needs of older people. For more information about the NIA, visit the website at http://www.nia.nih.gov/.
* Scott Moffat, Ph.D., formerly of the NIA, is now at Wayne State University, Detroit. Claudia Kawas, M.D., now at the University of California, Irvine, collaborated on this study while at the Johns Hopkins University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Baltimore under NIA/NIH grants, AG80325, AG05146, and M01 RR02719. Marc R. Blackman, M.D., collaborated on this study while at Johns Hopkins University; he is clinical director at the NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Former NIA investigator S. Mitchell Harman, M.D, Ph.D., is now at the Kronos Longevity Research Institute in Phoenix.
** Launched in 1958, the BLSA is America's longest running scientific examination of human aging. Volunteers receive comprehensive medical, physiological and neuropsychological evaluations every two years at the NIA Gerontology Research Center in Baltimore. The BLSA has measured testosterone levels in its male participants since 1963.
   
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05-21-2005, 08:21 PM

Low Testosterone Linked to Depression in Men

Reuters Health

By Alison McCook

Monday, February 2, 2004


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men with low levels of the male hormone testosterone are more than four times as likely to become depressed as other men, according to study findings released on Monday.

All of the testosterone-deficient men included in the study had a condition known as hypogonadism, which is also characterized by a decrease in muscle strength, loss of bone mass, fatigue, and declining interest in sex.

Since testosterone levels tend to peak early in life and decrease as men age, the rate of hypogonadism is highest in older men, reaching 30 percent among men older than 55.

Study author Dr. Molly M. Shores explained that these findings suggest that giving testosterone to men who are depressed and have low levels of the hormone could improve their mood. However, she noted that the results of past studies suggest that the solution for some men's blues may not be so simple.

Previous research has shown that testosterone helps correct depression in HIV-positive men who are also hypogonadal, and adding the hormone to antidepressant therapy may improve mood better than drugs alone, she said.

However, Shores noted that the only study to examine whether testosterone helps treat depression in older, hypogonadal men found that the hormone worked no better than an inactive drug.

"Further studies are needed before any clear recommendations can be given on the role of testosterone for treatment of depression in older men," Shores, based at the University of Washington in Seattle, told Reuters Health.

"For men with major depression, treatment should continue to consist of standard antidepressant treatment that has been proven to be effective in numerous studies," she stressed.

There is no evidence to suggest that men who are depressed and have relatively normal levels of testosterone may benefit from supplements of the hormone, added Shores, who is also affiliated with the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System.

During the study, Shores and her team followed 278 men 45 and older for two years, noting who developed depression. A total of 23 men were diagnosed with hypogonadism.

Roughly 20 percent of the men with testosterone deficiency developed depression during the study period, compared with only 7 percent of men with normal hormone levels, the authors report in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Shores explained that there are many possible reasons why testosterone deficiency may be linked to depression. The symptoms of hypogonadism - such as fatigue, muscle loss and decreased libido - could trigger a low mood, she noted, while changes in hormone levels themselves may also cause depression.

She added that she hopes these findings inspire other researchers to investigate further the role of testosterone in depression, as well as the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy in older men.

SOURCE: Archives of General Psychiatry, February 2004.
   
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05-21-2005, 08:23 PM

The effects of supraphysiological doses of testosterone on angry behavior in healthy eugonadal men--a clinical research center study.

Tricker R, Casaburi R, Storer TW, Clevenger B, Berman N, Shirazi A, Bhasin S
Division of Endocrinology, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California 90059, USA.

Anecdotal reports of "roid rage" and violent crimes by androgenic steroid users have brought attention to the relationship between anabolic steroid use and angry outbursts. However, testosterone effects on human aggression remain controversial. Previous studies have been criticized because of the low androgen doses, lack of placebo control or blinding, and inclusion of competitive athletes and those with preexisting psychopathology. To overcome these pitfalls, we used a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, excluded competitive athletes and those with psychiatric disorders, and used 600 mg testosterone enanthate (TE)/week. Forty-three eugonadal men, 19-40 yr, were ran***ized to 1 of 4 groups: Group I, placebo, no exercise; Group II, TE, no exercise; Group III, placebo, exercise; Group IV, TE plus exercise. Exercise consisted of thrice weekly strength training sessions. The Multi-Dimensional Anger Inventory (MAI), which includes 5 different dimensions of anger (inward anger, outward anger, anger arousal, hostile outlook, and anger eliciting situations), and a Mood Inventory (MI), which includes items related to mood and behavior, were administered to subjects before, during, and after the 10 week intervention. The subject's significant other (spouse, live-in partner, or parent) also answered the same questions about the subject's mood and behavior (Observer Mood Inventory, OMI). No differences were observed between exercising and nonexercising and between placebo and TE treated subjects for any of the 5 sub***ains of MAI. Overall there were no significant changes in MI or OMI during the treatment period in any group.

Conclusion: Supraphysiological doses of testosterone, when administered to normal men in a controlled setting, do not increase angry behavior. These data do not exclude the possibility that still higher doses of multiple steroids might provoke angry behavior in men with preexisting psychopathology.
   
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05-21-2005, 08:23 PM

That should be enough to shut him up. If not, Ill post more for you.
   
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05-21-2005, 08:36 PM

Thanks You Tee !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


An Old school attitude in a Scientific age of society. UP THE DOSE ! *chemicallyengineered*
   
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05-21-2005, 08:41 PM

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Thanks You Tee !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
No problem. I'm not sure if that was what you were looking for considering the guy sounds like a retard, but those should keep him busy for awhile.

Last edited by tee; 05-21-2005 at 09:17 PM.
   
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05-21-2005, 08:44 PM

way to go tee, if ya need some more, im sure i can dig some up for ya also.
   
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05-21-2005, 09:18 PM

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Originally Posted by pincrusher
way to go tee, if ya need some more, im sure i can dig some up for ya also.
We need to start a thread that is positive AAS articles and see how many we can come up with. Then when some prick comes along with his "Steroids will kill you" attitude, we can flood him.
   
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05-21-2005, 09:20 PM

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Originally Posted by tee
We need to start a thread that is positive AAS articles and see how many we can come up with. Then when some prick comes along with his "Steroids will kill you" attitude, we can flood him.
yeah, that sounds like a great idea. i can probably find a few over the next couple days.
   
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05-21-2005, 09:23 PM

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Originally Posted by pincrusher
yeah, that sounds like a great idea. i can probably find a few over the next couple days.
Ill start one when I get a chance and dig out allt he good ones I can find.
   
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05-21-2005, 10:02 PM

HAHA LOL i didn't say anythin yet, probably trying to understand the first sentence...


An Old school attitude in a Scientific age of society. UP THE DOSE ! *chemicallyengineered*
   
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05-21-2005, 10:14 PM

Well from what tee sent you you have alot of reading to do my friend. Damn Tee you couldn't break that shit down a little. Like a brief synopsis?
   
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